Weekly dosing of carboplatin increases risk of allergy in children Yu, D. Y., Dahl, G. V., Shames, R. S., Fisher, P. G. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2001: 349-352

Abstract

Carboplatin (CBDCA) has been used increasingly to treat pediatric low-grade gliomas. Allergic reactions to CBDCA have been reported in 2% to 30% of children. The reason for this high incidence of allergy is unclear.To determine the risk factors for CBDCA allergy, an historic cohort study was conducted for all children who received the drug during a 6-year period at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. The patients' medical records were reviewed for data on age, tumor type, CBDCA dose schedule, total number of doses, cumulative dosage, dose per treatment, other chemotherapy administered, and allergic reaction.Fifty-four children (mean age 7.2 years, 35 boys) were identified. Six children (11.1%) had an allergic reaction to CBDCA. All reactors had low-grade gliomas treated with weekly CBDCA and vincristine, with a dosage per treatment <500 mg/m2. Overall, six (75%) of eight children administered weekly CBDCA, 6 (46.2%) of 13 children with brain tumors, and 6 (40%) of 15 administered CBDCA dosage <500 mg/m2 manifested allergic reactions. Patients receiving more than five doses had significant risk for CBDCA allergy (relative risk [RR] = 11.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-94.1). Using logistic regression with multiple variables, weekly dose schedule was the most predictive covariate for allergic reaction (P < 0.000 1), and other factors were unrelated or redundant.Children with low-grade gliomas receiving CBDCA weekly are at significantly increased risk for CBDCA allergy. The repetitive, weekly dosing schedule of CBDCA appears to be a key risk factor for allergic reaction in brain tumor patients. The high frequency of allergy with weekly CBDCA warrants further consideration when planning future trials.

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View details for PubMedID 11563768