Complicated acute type B aortic dissection: Midterm results of emergency endovascular stent-grafting JOURNAL OF THORACIC AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY Verhoye, J. P., Miller, D. C., Sze, D., Dake, M. D., Mitchell, R. S. 2008; 136 (2): 424-430

Abstract

This study assessed midterm results of emergency endovascular stent-grafting for patients with life-threatening complications of acute type B aortic dissection.Between November 1996 and June 2004, 16 patients with complicated acute type B aortic dissections (mean age 57 years, range 16-88 years) underwent endovascular stent-grafting within 48 hours of presentation. Complications included contained rupture, hemothorax, refractory chest pain, and severe visceral or lower limb ischemia. Stent-graft types included custom-made first-generation endografts and second-generation commercial stent-grafts (Gore Excluder or TAG; W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc, Flagstaff, Ariz.). Follow-up was 100% complete, averaged 36 +/- 36 months, and included postprocedural surveillance computed tomographic scans.Early mortality was 25% +/- 11% (70% confidence limit), with no late deaths. No new neurologic complications occurred. According to the latest scan, 4 patients (25%) had complete thrombosis of the false lumen; the lumen was partially thrombosed in 6 patients (38%). Distal aortic diameter was increased in only 1 patient. Actuarial survival at 1 and 5 years was 73% +/- 11%; freedom from treatment failure (including aortic rupture, device fault, reintervention, aortic death, or sudden, unexplained late death) was 67% +/- 14% at 5 years.With follow-up to 9 years, endovascular stent-grafting for patients with complicated acute type B aortic dissection conferred benefit. Consideration of emergency stent-grafting may improve the dismal outlook for these patients; future refinements in stent-graft design and technology and earlier diagnosis and intervention should be associated with improved results.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2008.01.046

View details for Web of Science ID 000258535300026

View details for PubMedID 18692652