Jessica Ngo

Emergency medicine doctor

Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - Emergency Medicine

Emergency Department

  • 900 Quarry Road Extension
  • Stanford, CA 94304
  • Phone: 650-723-5111
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Professional Education

Residency: Stanford Hospital and Clinics - Emergency Medicine (2008) CA

Medical Education: Stanford Hospital and Clinics - Emergency Medicine (2005) CA

Board Certification: Emergency Medicine, American Board of Emergency Medicine (2009)

Fellowship, Stanford, EMS and Disaster Management (2009)

Residency, Stanford/Kaiser Residency, Emergency Medicine (2008)

M.D., Stanford University, Medicine (2005)

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, Molecular Biology (1999)

Honors & Awards

Stanford EM International Resident Scholar, Stanford (2008)

Administrative Appointments

Santa Clara Assistant Medical Director, SCC EMS (2008 - 2009)

De qi: Chinese acupuncture patients' experiences and beliefs regarding acupuncture needling sensation--an exploratory survey.
Mao, J. J., Farrar, J. T., Armstrong, K., Donahue, A., Ngo, J., & Bowman, M. A. (2007). De qi: Chinese acupuncture patients' experiences and beliefs regarding acupuncture needling sensation--an exploratory survey. Acupuncture in medicine , 25(4), 158-165.

Regional bone mineral density in male athletes: a comparison of soccer players, runners and controls
Fredericson, M., Chew, K., Ngo, J., Cleek, T., Kiratli, J., & Cobb, K. (2007). Regional bone mineral density in male athletes: a comparison of soccer players, runners and controls. BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 41(10), 664-668.

Effects of ball sports on future risk of stress fracture in runners
Fredericson, M., Ngo, J., & Cobb, K. (2005). Effects of ball sports on future risk of stress fracture in runners. CLINICAL JOURNAL OF SPORT MEDICINE, 15(3), 136-141.

Physicians and lay people are unable to apply pressure immobilization properly in a simulated snakebite scenario
Norris, R. L., Ngo, J., Nolan, K., & Hooker, G. (2005). Physicians and lay people are unable to apply pressure immobilization properly in a simulated snakebite scenario. WILDERNESS & ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, 16(1), 16-21.

Efficacy of low-dose acetazolamide (125 mg BID) for the prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness: A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial
Basnyat, B., Gertsch, J. H., Johnson, E. W., Castro-Marin, F., Inoue, Y., & Yeh, C. (2003). Efficacy of low-dose acetazolamide (125 mg BID) for the prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness: A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. HIGH ALTITUDE MEDICINE & BIOLOGY, 4(1), 45-52.