Level 1 Pediatric and Adult Trauma Center

The Stanford ED is a Level 1 Pediatric and Adult Trauma Center serving children and adults. We treat major and minor illnesses and injuries. From arrival to discharge and every step in between, find out what to expect during your visit.

Emergency Department
900 Quarry Road Extension
Stanford, CA 94304
Phone: 650-723-5111 Getting Here
Maps & Directions
900 Quarry Road Extension
Stanford, CA 94304
Phone: 650-723-5111 Getting Here
Current ED Wait Time
Estimated wait times are approximate and subject to change.
Current ED Wait Time
Estimated wait times are approximate and subject to change.

Our Doctors

Care and Treatment for Emergencies

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What do I do if I'm having chest pains?

IF YOU THINK YOU ARE HAVING A HEART ATTACK, CALL 9-1-1 IMMEDIATELY OR GO TO THE CLOSEST Emergency Department

Chest pain may be a sign of a heart attack.

Patients complaining of chest pain receive an electrocardiogram ("heart tracing" or ECG) within ten minutes of arrival at the Stanford Emergency Department. After evaluation by emergency doctors and cardiologists, if a patient is a candidate for balloon angioplasty or other intervention, they will be taken to the cardiac catheterization lab, which is available 24/7.

Stanford is home to a world renowned Stanford Cardiovascular Health, where patients may receive follow up care.

Signs of a heart attack:

  • Chest discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It commonly feels like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.
  • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body. Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or abdomen.
  • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.
  • Other signs may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness. Sometimes a person suffering a heart attack may pass out during an episode of chest discomfort.

Heart attack symptoms can be different (less pronounced) in women and include:

  • Chest discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It commonly feels like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.
  • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body. Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or abdomen.
  • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.
  • Other signs may be the ONLY signs in women. These include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness. Sometimes a person suffering a heart attack may pass out during an episode of chest discomfort. Women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting and back or jaw pain, and to perhaps not have very much chest pain.

It is extremely important to seek immediate medical care if you suspect you are having a heart attack. If you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of a heart attack, seek emergency help immediately - CALL 911 - do not wait!

What do I do if I think I might be having a stroke?

It is extremely important to seek immediate medical care if you suspect you are having a stroke. If you or someone you know is experiencing stroke symptoms, seek emergency assistance immediately - CALL 911 - do not wait!

Stanford uses a full range of stroke treatments, including thrombolytic ("clot busting") medicines and catheter-based mechanical thrombolytic devices. These treatments are time sensitive and can help reduce damage due to stroke.

DO NOT DELAY. SEEK EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU ARE HAVING A STROKE.

Stroke patients may receive follow up care at our renowned comprehensive Stroke Center.

About one-third of all strokes are preceded by one or more episodes of a neurological deficit(s), known as transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) and sometimes as "mini-strokes." TIAs can occur days, weeks or even months before a stroke.

Don't ignore signs, even if they go away. TIAs are often early warning signs of a more serious and debilitating stroke that will occur in the future.

Signs of a stroke:

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, or loss of balance or coordination

It is extremely important to seek immediate medical care if you suspect you are having a stroke. If you or someone you know is experiencing stroke symptoms, seek emergency help immediately - CALL 911 - do not wait!

I am LESS than twenty weeks pregnant, where should I go for treatment of emergency signs and symptoms?

Monday–Friday, 9am-5pm: 
contract Labor and Delivery at Stanford Children's Hospital by calling 650-498-4069 and ask to speak with a nurse. You will be given further instructions at that time.


After business hours or on holidays:


Go to the Stanford Emergency Department for care.

Seek medical care if you are experiencing any of the following:

  • Temperature higher than 100 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Chills with or without fever
  • Strong or constant abdominal pain
  • Severe vomiting lasting 24 hours or more
  • Vaginal bleeding – bright red, soaking a pad an hour or similar to regular menstrual flow
  • Wound or blow to the abdomen
  • Painful urination
What do I do if my child is sick?

Stanford Health Care has a dedicated Pediatric Emergency Department. Our doctors have special expertise in pediatric emergencies and many are board certified in both pediatrics and emergency medicine. After you register in the main Emergency Department lobby, the Patient Access Representative (registrar) will assist you in locating the pediatric waiting room, which is designed for your child's comfort.

For Patients

The Stanford Emergency Department is open 24 hours a day. The Fast Track program is open daily from 11:30am-11:30pm and provides emergency care for patients 2 and older with minor illnesses and injuries. Most Fast Track patients are discharged within 90 minutes.

PREPARE FOR YOUR VISIT

Most Emergency Department visits aren't planned. However, if you are able, please bring the following with you:

  • Photo ID
  • Health insurance information (card)
  • List of prescription medications and dosages
  • List of medications to which you are allergic
  • List of questions you and your family may have
  • Recent test results related to your condition
  • Contact information for your regular medical providers

International Patients
Phone: +1 650-723-8561
Email: IMS@stanfordmed.org

If you are experiencing a medical emergency, call 9-1-1