IF YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW SHOULD EXPERIENCE SYMPTOMS OF STROKE, SEEK EMERGENCY HELP IMMEDIATELY - CALL 911 - DO NOT WAIT!

What Is a Stroke?

A stroke (also called a "cerebrovascular accident" or CVA) occurs when blood vessels carrying oxygen and other nutrients to a specific part of the brain suddenly burst or become blocked. When blood fails to get through to the affected parts of the brain, the oxygen supply is cut off, and brain cells begin to die.

The blood supply to the brain is very important. Brain cells must have a continuous supply of oxygen and other nutrients from the blood in order to function. To meet this demand, blood is pumped continuously from the heart to the brain via several artery groups.

Within the brain, these arteries (known as cerebral arteries) branch into smaller and smaller arteries, and eventually into tiny vessels called capillaries. These thin-walled vessels supply the nutrients to millions of nerve cells within the brain. When this continuous blood supply is disrupted, a stroke results.

Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are research studies that evaluate a new medical approach, device, drug, or other treatment. As a Stanford Health Care patient, you have access to the latest, advanced clinical trials.

Open trials refer to studies currently accepting participants. Closed trials are not currently enrolling, but may open in the future.

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