Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a less invasive procedure used to treat patients with severe aortic stenosis, who are at increased risk for traditional surgical aortic valve replacement. Aortic stenosis causes a narrowing of the aortic valve, which makes it more difficult for the heart to pump blood.

The TAVR procedure enables the delivery of an artificial heart valve, through a small incision, using a catheter-based approach. The new valve functions like a normal heart valve, improves blood flow, and reduces symptoms caused by aortic stenosis. Stanford is one of only three hospitals in Northern California that performs this procedure.

Integrated patient care provides comprehensive assessment and treatments for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis, with an emphasis on those patients considered high operative risk for morbidity and mortality due to their age and/or other medical co-morbidities.

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an innovative and newly FDA-approved, catheter-based therapy that provides a less invasive approach to relieving aortic stenosis. Stanford's cardiologists, cardiovascular surgeons, and cardiovascular anesthesiologists have collaborated on and performed nearly two hundread TAVR surgeries since the Stanford TAVR program's inception.

Stanford Health Care is one of only three hospitals in Northern California that performs this procedure. Stanford has been providing TAVR treatment to patients with severe aortic stenosis, who are unfit to undergo open surgical AVR or who are very high risk for AVR since 2008.

The program includes:

  • A complex evaluation process involving multi-disciplinary assessment
  • High quality transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography
  • The latest advances in radiographic imaging and anesthetic techniques
  • Collaborative multi-disciplinary decision making and experience