Our Patients

Recasting the Future: Donor Families' Selfless Gifts Are Legacy and Life for Others

08.01.2009

Anabel Stenzel and her twin, Isabel Stenzel-Byrnes, were born with cystic fibrosis, a lung disease that would have ended their lives without lung transplants.

The Stenzel twins have long been regulars at local pools.  Swimming is a part of a life that includes daily exercise and other physical activity that maintains overall health. 

We have huge gratitude that we could be offered a lung transplant and that we could survive and do really well.

-Isabel Stenzel-Byrnes, transplant patient at Stanford Hospital & Clinics
WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION:
  • Physicians can transplant the heart, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, intestine, bone and other tissues
  • Stanford Hospital & Clinics is one of only three hospitals in California that perform transplants of heart, heart-lung, liver, lung, kidney, kidney-pancreas and intestine.
  • In California, the current waiting list for organs tallies more than 20,000; total transplants performed in the state in 2006 reached 3,064.
  • Nearly 80 percent of the current California waiting list requests are for kidneys. Last year, just over 10 percent of those requests were filled.
  • Every 11 minutes in the United States, another name is added to the organ transplant waiting list. The current waiting list numbers more than 100,000. From January to May of this year, about 12,000 transplants were performed in the U.S.
  • The length of time spent on a waiting list is determined by medical need, expected outcome, blood and tissue type, size of organ, height and weight of candidate, an individual hospital's criteria for recipient and donor acceptance, and distance between donor and recipient hospital.

We've taken on higher risk patients in the last four years than we've ever done before. We're encouraged by the results we're seeing.

-David Weill, MD, Director, Stanford Hospital Lung Transplant Program

Left to right: Dr. David Weill, Nurse Coordinator Mary Martel, transplant fellow Mihaela Ivan and social workers Tonia Gregory and Lesley Seeger.

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