Demographic Factors Affect Willingness to Register as an Organ Donor More Than a Personal Relationship with a Transplant Candidate DIGESTIVE DISEASES AND SCIENCES Regalia, K., Zheng, P., Sillau, S., Aggarwal, A., Bellevue, O., Fix, O. K., Prinz, J., Dunn, S., Biggins, S. W. 2014; 59 (7): 1386-1391

Abstract

Transplant candidate caregivers (TCCs) are an under-utilized but potentially devoted pool of advocates who themselves may be recruited to register for deceased organ donation.The purpose of this study was to assess and compare recruitment barriers to deceased donor registration efforts in TCCs and health fair attendees (HFAs).A 42-item questionnaire assessing willingness to register as an organ donor and perceptions and knowledge about organ donation was administered to 452 participants (174 in Denver, 278 in San Francisco). Logistic regression, stratified by study site, was used to assess associations between explanatory variables and willingness to register as an organ donor.In Denver, 83 % of TCCs versus 68 % of HFAs indicated a willingness to register (p = 0.03). Controlling for study group (TCC vs HFA), predictors of willingness to register were female gender [odds ratio (OR) 2.4], Caucasian race (OR 2.3), college graduate (OR 11.1), married (OR 2.4) and higher positive perception of organ donation (OR 1.2), each p < 0.05. In San Francisco, 58 % of TCCs versus 70 % of HFAs indicated a willingness to register (p = 0.03). Controlling for study group (TCC vs HFA), predictors of willingness to register were Caucasian race (OR 3.5), college graduate (OR 2.2), married (OR 1.9), higher knowledge (OR 1.6) and higher positive perception of organ donation (OR 1.2), each p < 0.05. In both locales, Caucasians were more likely to have positive perceptions about organ donation and were more willing to register.Demographic characteristics, not personal connection to a transplant candidate, explain willingness to register as an organ donor.

View details for DOI 10.1007/s10620-014-3053-2

View details for Web of Science ID 000338344500011

View details for PubMedID 24519521