Lung cancer incidence trends by histology type among Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander populations in the United States, 1990-2010. Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Cheng, I., Le, G. M., Noone, A. M., Gali, K., Patel, M., Haile, R. W., Wakelee, H. A., Gomez, S. L. 2014; 23 (11): 2250–65

Abstract

Lung cancer is one of the leading cancer sites diagnosed among Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Native Hawaiians (AANHPI). To better understand the patterns of lung cancer incidence among AANHPIs, we examined the incidence trends of five histologic cell types of lung cancer across ten AANHPI populations in comparison with non-Hispanic Whites.Lung cancer incidence data from 1990 through 2010 were obtained from 13 U.S. population-based cancer registries. Age-adjusted histologic cell-type-specific incidence rates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Joinpoint regression models and annual percentage change (APC) statistics were used to characterize the magnitude and direction of trends.From 1990 through 2010, incidence rates of adenocarcinoma increased significantly for Filipino and Korean women with a 2.6% and 3.0% annual percentage increase, respectively. More recently, a significant rise in the incidence of adenocarcinoma was observed for Chinese men (1996-2010; APC = 1.3%). Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) increased 2.4% per year among Japanese women. For SCC, small cell lung carcinoma, large cell and other specified carcinoma, and unspecified types, stable or decreasing trends were observed in most AANHPI groups and non-Hispanic Whites.AANHPIs demonstrate a range in the burden of lung cancer across histologies and specific populations.These findings illustrate the importance of disaggregating AANHPIs into their specific populations. The rise in incidence of adenocarcinoma and SCC among certain AANHPIs demonstrates the need for research into non-tobacco associated risk factors for these populations and targeted efforts for tobacco prevention.

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