COVID-19

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Even as coronavirus vaccines become more widely distributed, a significant chunk of Americans remain unsure or skeptical about the vaccine. Julie Parsonnet, MD, Stanford Medicine infectious disease doctor, shares some tips for handling tough vaccine-related conversations with your loved ones.
June 23, 2021

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Stanford researchers have found signs of inflammation, genetic changes and impaired circuitry in the brains of people killed by COVID-19, important clues to the mysterious “brain fog” and mental struggles reported by many patients. The research also reveals haunting similarities between the brains of those killed by COVID-19 and other degenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD, Stanford Medicine neurological scientist, provides comment.
June 23, 2021

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People sometimes called "long haulers" experience long Covid, post-Covid conditions, post-Covid syndrome -- there's no settled name. There's also no diagnostic test, no specific treatment, no pill to take. And while research is ongoing, there aren't large, peer-reviewed, gold-standard clinical trials yet either. Some people get better on their own over time, or symptoms can be treated, but for others, recovery remains elusive. Mitchell Miglis, MD, Stanford Medicine autonomic disorders specialist, provides comment.
June 18, 2021

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The pandemic has taken a massive toll on people's mental health. But a new report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirms what many of us are seeing and feeling in our own lives: The impact has been particularly devastating for parents and unpaid caregivers of adults. Dolores Gallagher Thompson, PhD, ABPP, Stanford Medicine psychologist, provides comment.
June 17, 2021

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Long after some people have recovered from the virus, they find certain foods off-putting. Zara Patel, MD, Stanford Medicine otolaryngologist and director of endoscopic skull base surgery, provides comment.
June 15, 2021

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Over 70% of San Francisco residents have received at least one COVID-19 vaccine shot. Public health officials say that's good, but are still continuing efforts to reach their unvaccinated population. Julie Parsonnet, MD, Stanford Medicine infectious disease doctor, provides comment.
June 14, 2021

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Add this to the growing list of reasons why you don’t want to get COVID-19. Two new studies published in the journal Cell Metabolism show how the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) could possibly give you diabetes. Research led by Peter Jackson, PhD, Stanford Medicine professor of Microbiology and Immunology, is referenced.
June 11, 2021

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With COVID-19 vaccines authorized for adults and teens, shotmakers and regulators are turning their attention to ensuring that the vaccines are safe and effective for younger children. The FDA’s independent vaccine advisory committee grappled Thursday with how to ensure the safety of COVID-19 shots in children as disease caseloads continue to dwindle in the U.S. Hayley Gans, MD, Stanford Medicine clinical professor of pediatrics – infectious diseases, provides comment.
June 10, 2021

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California is now sequencing up to 10% of all coronavirus cases, a huge improvement from less than 0.5% at the start of the year. That means the state is now, finally, doing enough sequencing that infectious disease experts say they have a good grasp of the types of variants spreading here, and they are confident that scientists will be able to spot any new mutations quickly. Benjamin Pinsky, MD, PhD, Stanford Medicine associate professor of pathology and of infectious diseases and medical director of the Stanford Clinical Virology Lab, provides comment.
June 6, 2021

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As the nation edges closer to President Biden’s goal of a 70 percent vaccination rate, many people are beginning to wonder how long their protection will last. For now, scientists are asking a lot of questions about COVID-19 booster shots, but they don’t yet have many answers. Although many scientists estimate that the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines will last at least a year, no one knows for sure. It’s also unclear whether emerging variants of the coronavirus will change our vaccination needs. Grace Lee, MD, Stanford Medicine professor of pediatrics, provides comment.
June 6, 2021

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As of right now, it appears that the Tokyo Olympics — postponed from last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic — will proceed as scheduled beginning July 23. Whether they should is an entirely different discussion. Anne Liu, MD, Stanford Medicine clinical associate professor of medicine and of pediatrics, provides comment.
June 1, 2021

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A new study of COVID-19 data by the Stanford University School of Medicine found roughly 70% of patients hospitalized with moderate or severe disease still suffered from a variety of symptoms months after recovering from their initial infection. Steven Goodman, MD, MHS, PhD, Stanford Medicine professor of epidemiology and population health, provides comment.
June 1, 2021

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The American Academy of Pediatrics updated its guidance on proper mask use for children aged between 2 and 12 years who cannot receive a COVID-19 vaccine, as well as unvaccinated children and adolescents. Yvonne Maldonado, MD, Stanford Medicine professor of pediatrics and chair of the Committee on Infectious Diseases for the American Academy of Pediatrics, provides comment.
June 1, 2021

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Malathi Srinivasan, MD, Stanford Medicine professor of primary care and population health, discusses the rare cases of myocarditis following vaccination in some younger recipients.
May 31, 2021

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A new study underscored the importance of vaccination, detailing how many who had COVID-19 can suffer from symptoms months later. Nearly three-quarters of patients with moderate-to-severe COVID-19 had at least one long-term symptom. Tahmina Nasserie, PhD candidate in Epidemiology and Clinical Research, and lead author of the paper, provides comment.
May 28, 2021

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The pandemic has disproportionately affected the Latino community in a variety of ways. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Latinos are twice as likely to contract the virus as white adults are and 2.3 times more likely to die from it. A group of Latino senators sent a letter to the Biden administration Friday, urging top officials to improve access to COVID-19 vaccines in Latino communities. Jorge Caballero, MD, Stanford Medicine anesthesiologist and co-founder of the group Coders Against COVID, provides comment.
May 28, 2021

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Among more than 101 million people who were fully vaccinated in the U.S. during the study period from Jan. to April 30—meaning they were two weeks out from their last vaccine dose—10,262 cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection were reported by state and local health departments to the CDC. That works out to just 0.01% of vaccinated people with a confirmed infection. Yvonne Maldonado, MD, Stanford Medicine professor of pediatrics and epidemiology, provides comment.
May 28, 2021

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Moderna said on Tuesday that its coronavirus vaccine, authorized only for use in adults, was powerfully effective in 12- to 17-year-olds. In a clinical trial of the vaccine in adolescents, there were no cases of symptomatic Covid-19 among fully vaccinated teens, the company reported in a news release. Yvonne Maldonado, MD, Stanford Medicine professor of pediatrics and chair of the Committee on Infectious Diseases for the American Academy of Pediatrics, provides comment.
May 25, 2021

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A growing number of people are facing mountains of frustration over health problems that linger after COVID-19 with no clear path to improvement. But for a subset of people with what's known as "long COVID," a POTS diagnosis offers a road map to treatment options and relief from their often-debilitating symptoms. Mitch Miglis, MD, Stanford Medicine autonomic disorders specialist, provides comment.
May 22, 2021

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is looking into reports that a very small number of teenagers and young adults vaccinated against the coronavirus may have experienced heart problems, according to the agency’s vaccine safety group. Yvonne Maldonado, MD, Stanford Medicine professor of pediatrics and chair of the Committee on Infectious Diseases for the American Academy of Pediatrics, provides comment.
May 22, 2021

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Just as California was ramping up its vaccination campaign, new variants of the coronavirus were emerging that threatened to trigger a fresh surge of cases. But, the variant wave never swelled into a surge. Benjamin Pinsky, MD, PhD, Stanford Medicine associate professor of pathology and of infectious diseases and medical director of the Stanford Clinical Virology Lab, provides commentary.
May 19, 2021

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The end of this pandemic sometimes gets boiled down to two words: herd immunity. But now, as an academic debate swirls over when or even if America can get to a high enough percentage of people with immunity to reach that goal, some scientists say it's time for the public to stop worrying about it. Erin Mordecai, PhD, Stanford University biologist, provides commentary.
May 18, 2021

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In just one month, the percentage of California residents showing some immune protection has soared from 47% to 67%, and is likely higher now, according to a new analysis from the state. Steven Goodman, MD, MHS, PhD, Stanford Medicine professor of epidemiology and population health, provides commentary.
May 17, 2021

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The abrupt relaxation of mask guidance by the CDC on May 13 came as a surprise to many people, including public health and infectious disease experts who follow pandemic trends closely and weren’t expecting the move for another few weeks, or even months. Steven Goodman, MD, MHS, PhD, Stanford Medicine professor of epidemiology and population health, provides commentary.
May 15, 2021

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A group of Stanford University researchers spent five months looking over COVID-19 cases in Placer County. Their findings suggest a significant difference between the number of positive cases the county’s health department reported, and the number of residents who had antibodies, with an estimated 68% of cases unreported.
April 23, 2021

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The relentless pace of death from the global COVID-19 pandemic is continuing unabated despite global vaccination efforts, and is now being increasingly borne by the poorest places in the world. Bali Pulendran, PhD, Stanford Medicine professor of pathology and of microbiology and immunology, advises that disparities in immunization pose a threat to the world.
April 17, 2021

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With 13 COVID-19 vaccines in use around the world, pharmaceutical companies are exploring second-generation technology that could change how doses are administered and distributed. These vaccines could be taken orally as a capsule that could be swallowed, as a tablet that dissolves under the tongue or as a nasal spray. Such formulations would not require refrigeration, nor would they need healthcare workers to administer them. Lawrence Steinman, MD, Stanford Medicine professor of neurology and pediatrics, provides comment.
April 16, 2021

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In January 2020, just weeks after the first Covid-19 cases emerged in China, the full genome of the new coronavirus was published online. Using this genomic sequence, scientists scrambled to design a large assortment of diagnostic tests for the virus. But the virus has mutated since then. And as the coronavirus has evolved, so has the landscape of testing. Gary Schoolnik, MD, Stanford Medicine clinician and professor of medicine, explains that if a test misses someone who is infected by a variant, then that person may not realize they need to isolate and the test can contribute to the spread of the variant.
April 14, 2021

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The next critical step in reaching herd immunity against COVID-19 is vaccinating children. On Wednesday, Stanford Medicine began a trial of the Pfizer vaccine in children under the age of 5.
April 14, 2021

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As more parents get vaccinated ahead of their children, some families are finding themselves with questions: Is it finally OK to have indoor play dates? Can we take summer vacations, or fly on airplanes? What if my kids are high risk? Carmin Powell, MD, Stanford Medicine pediatrician, provides advice to families and encourages them to talk with their pediatricians.
April 13, 2021

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A new COVID-19 variant, described as the “India” variant or “double mutant,” was identified in the Bay Area by the Stanford Clinical Virology Lab last week. This variant has the L452R mutation, which has recently caused massive outbreaks in California, as well as another significant spike mutation, E484Q.
April 4, 2021

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The idea of vaccine passports is gaining attention in the U.S., drawing support and controversy. David Magnus, PhD, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, shares that he believes vaccine passports are not ethically nor scientifically a good idea, warning they could create another inequity in society and that right now we don’t know how long immunity to COVID-19 lasts.
April 4, 2021

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With people still dying from COVID-19, public health officials stress that testing is still critical. Robert Siegel, MD, PhD, Stanford Medicine professor of microbiology and immunology, shares that testing is important even when the prevalence of COVID-19 in a community is low.
April 1, 2021

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We don’t yet have the research to determine an exact estimate of how long immunity to COVID-19 lasts following vaccination. Yvonne Maldonado, MD, Stanford Medicine professor of pediatrics and Stanford Children’s Health director of infection control, discusses the importance of vaccinating people globally to halt the evolution of new virus variants.
April 1, 2021

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• Health officials are urging the public to maintain vigilance as every coronavirus variant of concern, as defined by the CDC, has now been detected in Santa Clara County, including variants first detected in the United Kingdom, South Africa, Brazil, and California. Benjamin Pinsky, MD, PhD, Stanford Medicine associate professor of pathology and of infectious diseases and medical director of the Stanford Clinical Virology Lab, describes a new variant from India recently detected in the county by his lab. Grace Lee, MD, Stanford Medicine professor of pediatrics and a member of a vaccine advisory committee at the CDC, expresses concern about variants spreading while the community is still being vaccinated.
April 1, 2021

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Since the pandemic began, children and adolescents have higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress, and even more specific issues such as addictive internet behaviors. Celeste Birkhofer, PhD, PsyD, Stanford Medicine adjunct clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses the unusually high rates of referrals she and her colleagues are seeing.
March 31, 2021

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Stanford University scientists have decoded the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines using leftover vaccine in vials bound for the trash and published the mRNA sequences on Github. The Pfizer sequence was already publicly available, but the Moderna mRNA sequence had not previously been published.
March 30, 2021

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As adults around the world get vaccinated against COVID-19, pharmaceutical companies have started clinical trials in kids. Yvonne Maldonado, MD, the Taube Professor in Global Health and Infectious Diseases, professor of pediatrics and medical director of infection control at Stanford Children’s Health, provides insight into the importance of vaccinating kids, who represent about a quarter of the U.S. population.
March 30, 2021

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Stanford's Center for Innovation in Global Health worked in tandem with the Indian Health Service to craft a COVID-19 response, using an approach that emphasized Indigenous Sovereignty. Sara J. Jumping Eagle, MD, a pediatrician and the clinical director and acting CEO of Pine Ridge's branch of the Indian Health Service, forged the partnership. She is a graduate of the Stanford University School of Medicine.
March 29, 2021

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Talking openly about grief can be vulnerable, but it’s no secret that death and loss are wildly disruptive. This has only been complicated by COVID-19. Irvin Yalom, MD, Stanford Medicine professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides guidance on how to avoid the regret that can come with grief.
March 29, 2021

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The COVID-19 pandemic created the perfect test for telemedicine, providing a crash course on how video visits work. As doctors resume in-person visits, virtual care is poised to play a permanent role, with evidence showing that it is highly convenient and often works just as well, and sometimes better, for a range of care. Christopher Sharp, MD, Stanford Health Care chief medical information officer discusses telehealth and video visits.
March 28, 2021

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This article discusses the CDC’s guidelines for vaccinated people and quotes Yvonne Maldonado, the Taube Professor in Global Health and Infectious Diseases, professor of pediatrics and medical director of infection control at Stanford Children’s Health.
March 8, 2021

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Stanford Health Care and the County of Santa Clara are partnering to further expand access to vaccination for people in areas disproportionately affected by COVID-19 through a new mass vaccination clinic at Eastridge Mall in East San Jose.
March 5, 2021

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This segment discussed patients who continue to have symptoms months after their COVID-19 diagnosis. Aruna Subramanian, clinical professor of medicine, has been studying roughly 100 long-haul patients and was interviewed.
March 4, 2021

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A first look at the potential effect of stretching limited COVID-19 vaccine supplies has found that just one dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was 60% to 70% effective at preventing symptomatic disease in people age 70 and older. Grace Lee, professor of pediatrics and a member of the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, provides comment in this story.
March 3, 2021

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During this morning’s live segment, Dean Lloyd Minor discussed the latest in COVID-19 developments, including the newly FDA-authorized Johnson & Johnson vaccine.
March 1, 2021

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Test manufacturers and scientists are monitoring COVID-19 variants and stand ready to modify the tests if the need arises. Benjamin Pinsky, associate professor of pathology and of infectious diseases and medical director of the Stanford Clinical Virology Lab, provides comment in this article.
February 28, 2021

Press Release
The 368-bed hospital building, which celebrates its one-year anniversary on Nov. 17, features technology and design features that have made handling COVID-19 cases easier.
November 17, 2020

Other News
Researchers found that Black and Hispanic people made up 58% of all patients hospitalized for COVID-19 and 53% of those who died from the disease.
November 17, 2020

Other News
This fall, medical and physician assistant students vaccinated thousands of people against the flu. The vaccinations could help prevent hospitals from being inundated with flu patients if COVID-19 cases surge.
November 13, 2020

Press Release
A special report in Stanford Medicine magazine offers a look at Stanford Medicine’s response to the new coronavirus, as well as outside perspectives on the pandemic.
October 20, 2020

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Yvonne Maldonado, MD, Stanford Children’s Health director of infection control, discusses public interest in a saliva test for COVID-19 with The Los Angeles Times.
October 6, 2020

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Ariel Ganz, PhD, Stanford Medicine postdoctoral scholar, discusses the Open COVID Pledge with ScopeBlog. More than 30 companies, institutions or organizations have signed on.
October 5, 2020

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Stanford University, the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, and a group of collaborators have created a low-cost system to collect samples for COVID-19 testing and monitor populations for the disease.
September 30, 2020

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David Schneider, PhD, Stanford Medicine professor and chair of microbiology and immunology, discusses the concept of “disease tolerance” in the context of COVID-19 with Elemental.
September 30, 2020

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Bali Pulendran, PhD, Stanford Medicine professor of microbiology and immunology, discusses the body’s immune response to COVID-19 with the Associated Press
September 30, 2020

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Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, Stanford Children’s Health director of infection control, and Lawrence Steinman, the Dr. George Zimmermann, Stanford Medicine professor of pediatrics, discuss the remarkably low child deaths from COVID-19 eight months into U.S. pandemic with The Washington Post.
September 25, 2020

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This article recaps findings published by Stanford University and Ascend Clinical laboratory in The Lancent, indicating that fewer than 1 in 10 Americans show signs of past coronavirus infection. Julie Parsonnet, the George Deforest Barnett Professor in medicine and professor of health research and policy; Shuchi Anand, assistant professor of medicine; and Maria Montez-Rath, director of the biostatistics core in nephrology, are the study’s co-authors.
September 25, 2020

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Dr. Andra Blomkalns, Chair of the Stanford Medicine Department of Emergency Medicine, discusses how COVID-19 patient care has improved since the start of the pandemic with The Mercury News.
September 21, 2020

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Dr. Zara Patel, Stanford Medicine Director of Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery and an Associate Professor of Otolaryngology, discusses olfactory dysfunction with Smithsonian Magazine.
September 21, 2020

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Dr. Christina Kong, Stanford Health Care medical director of pathology, discusses with CapRadio how Stanford Health Care is working with California schools to test school staff for COVID-19.
September 20, 2020

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James Liu, Stanford Health Care librarian, discusses volunteering as a coronavirus as a contact tracer with ScopeBlog.
September 18, 2020

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Dr. Anne Liu, Stanford Medicine infectious disease expert, discusses planning for flu season and staying safe amid COVID-19 with ABC7.
September 17, 2020

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Dr. Nina Vasan, Stanford Medicine clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses keeping cool under pandemic parenting stress with The Washington Post.
September 17, 2020

Other News
Since elective procedures at Stanford Health Care resumed in April, clinicians and administrators in dermatology are caring for patients in the safest way possible.
September 17, 2020

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Dr. Dean Winslow, professor of medicine, weighs in on TODAY about whether or not seniors should take extra precautions this coming fall.
September 16, 2020

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Dr. Dean Winslow, an infectious disease specialist at Stanford Health Care, talks with ABC 7 News about the possibilities of going trick-or-treating this Halloween.
September 15, 2020

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Dr. Dean Winslow, professor of medicine, is featured in TODAY discussing dining out and COVID-19.
September 15, 2020

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Makeda Robinson, a postdoctoral research fellow in infectious diseases, talks with Verywell Health about COVID-19 mutations.
September 15, 2020

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During this Medical Monday segment, Maja Artandi, clinical associate professor of medicine and medical director of the CROWN clinic, discussed the long-term symptoms of COVID-19 and how the virus interacts with the immune system.
September 14, 2020

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Dr. Jason Wang, Stanford Medicine pediatrician, reviewed the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines for schools choosing to reopen in this ScopeBlog article and podcast.
September 14, 2020

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Dr. Makeda Robinson, Stanford Medicine infectious diseases fellow, speaks with Healthline about how an older immune system may react to SARS-CoV-2.
September 12, 2020

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Lawrence Steinman, the George A. Zimmermann Professor and professor of pediatrics, co-authored a list of likely biological factors underlying the reduced development of COVID-19 for children compared to adults.
September 10, 2020

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Christina Kong, vice chair of clinical affairs and medical director of Stanford Health Care’s pathology and clinical laboratories, talks how bay area schools are conducting COVID-19 test in preparation for school opening.
September 10, 2020

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Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, a professor of pediatrics, talks with TODAY about shrinking your quarantine bubble.
September 9, 2020

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Dr. Stacie Vilendrer, instructor of medicine, talks with KPIX 5 CBS SF Bay Area about college and COVID-19.
September 8, 2020

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During this live segment, Dean Lloyd Minor discussed what guidelines are in place to ensure that a COVID-19 vaccine is safe, effective and trustworthy.
September 8, 2020

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Stanford Medicine faculty are helping Bay Area school districts determine how to access COVID-19 testing and are advising the Los Angeles Unified School District on its testing strategy. Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, professor of pediatrics and medical director of infection control at Stanford Children’s Health, was interviewed during this segment.
September 1, 2020

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Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, professor of pediatrics and medical director of infection control at Stanford Children’s Health, talks with the New York Times about the likelihood of minority children being infected.
September 1, 2020

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Dr. Malathi Srinivasan, a clinical professor and internal medicine doctor, is featured with KPIX 5 CBS SF Bay Area to talk about COVID-19 reinfections.
August 31, 2020

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Today.com features Dr. Anne Liu, an infectious disease physician, and talks about the risks of public transportation and how to stay safe and healthy.
August 31, 2020

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Dr. Seema Yasmin, clinical assistant professor of medicine, pens an opinion on the New York Times about how Facebook is affecting doctors' jobs due to misleading and incorrect information about COVID-19
August 28, 2020

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Bonnie Halpern-Felsher, professor of pediatrics, explains increased risk for COVID-19 in a Healio article in e-cigarette users.
August 28, 2020

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Doctors, scientists and public health experts are concerned about the fall and winter season with COVID-19 and seasonal influenza. Evidence has shown people can contract both. Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, professor of pediatrics and medical director of infection control at Stanford Children’s Health, is quoted in this article.
August 28, 2020

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Marwa Abu El Haija, clinical assistant professor of pediatric gastroenterology, is featured on the Stanford Daily, discussing how obesity can increase the likelihood of contracting COVID-19.
August 28, 2020

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Dr. Jorge Caballero, clinical instructor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, co-founded a volunteer organization that maps COVID-19 testing locations and displays updated data about the pandemic.
August 27, 2020

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Dr. Barbara Bentley, pediatric psychologist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford, talks with KPIX 5 about the effects of COVID-19 and wildfires on the mental health of children.
August 25, 2020

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This piece examines COVID-19's effects on LGBTQ+ health, although more data is needed. Mitchell Lunn, assistant professor of medicine, is quoted in this post.
August 18, 2020

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Many symptoms of the coronavirus, such as a fever, overlap with those of flu. This piece offers guidance on what to do if a child may have been exposed to COVID-19. Jason Wang, associate professor of pediatrics, is quoted here.
August 17, 2020

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Postdoctoral scholar Shivani Mathur Gaiha talks with the Washington Post about studies show the risk of contracting COVID-19 increasing due to vape use.
August 17, 2020

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Bali Pulendran, the Violetta L. Horton Professor and professor of pathology and of microbiology and immunology, talks with KCBS radio regarding study about developing COVID-19 symptoms.
August 13, 2020

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In this piece, healthcare executives, including David Entwistle, president and CEO of Stanford Health Care, discuss their organizations’ roles and responsibilities as public health educators amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
August 10, 2020

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Dr. David Relman, the Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor and a professor of microbiology and immunology, talks with KPIX CBS SF Bay Area about the latest on COVID-19.
July 27, 2020

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Dr. Thomas Ken Lew, assistant clinical professor of medicine at Stanford and an attending physician at Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare, discusses why it's not advised to wait to seek medical treatment during COVID-19.
May 28, 2020

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In the latest 1:2:1 podcast hosted by Paul Costello, senior communications strategist and advisor, Catherine Krna, vice president of ambulatory care and service lines at Stanford Health Care and chief administrative officer of University HealthCare Alliance, discusses how she is inspired by clinicians during the COVID-19 response, and sees lasting benefit of the surge in telehealth.
May 27, 2020

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In a 1:2:1 podcast hosted by Paul Costello, senior communications strategist and advisor, Sam Wald, clinical professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, discussed how the system is keeping patients safe as surgeries and other procedures resume.
May 19, 2020

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Dr. Thomas Ken Lew, assistant clinical professor of medicine at Stanford and an attending physician at Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare, provides advice for young people regarding coronavirus.
April 2, 2020