The impact of breastfeeding on postpartum pain after vaginal and cesarean delivery. Journal of clinical anesthesia Wen, L., Hilton, G., Carvalho, B. 2015; 27 (1): 33-38

Abstract

Oxytocin may play a role in pain modulation. The analgesic effects of breastfeeding with its associated endogenous oxytocin release have not been well investigated. To determine the impact of breastfeeding on incisional, perineal, and cramping pain after cesarean and vaginal delivery.Institutional review board-approved prospective observational study.Labor and delivery and maternity wards.Healthy (American Society of Anesthesiology physical statuses 1 and 2) multiparous women who had cesarean (n = 40) and vaginal (n = 43) deliveries of singleton term infants and who were breastfeeding were enrolled.Women completed diaries to record incisional, perineal, or cramping pain scores 5 minutes before, during, and 5 minutes after breastfeeding.Demographic, obstetric, and neonatal variables, as well as analgesic use, were recorded.There was no difference in incisional pain before, during, and after breastfeeding in women post-cesarean delivery. Cramping pain was significantly increased during, as compared with before or after breastfeeding in both the vaginal (P < .001) and cesarean (P < .001) delivery cohorts.There was no analgesic effect on incisional pain during breastfeeding, indicating that endogenous oxytocin associated with breastfeeding may not play a significant role in postpartum cesarean wound pain modulation. Breastfeeding increased cramping pain after vaginal and cesarean delivery. The increase in cramping pain is most likely due to the breastfeeding-associated oxytocin surge increasing uterine tone.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jclinane.2014.06.010

View details for PubMedID 25468582