CK2 alpha/CSNK2A1 Phosphorylates SIRT6 and Is Involved in the Progression of Breast Carcinoma and Predicts Shorter Survival of Diagnosed Patients AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PATHOLOGY Bae, J. S., Park, S., Jamiyandorj, U., Kim, K. M., Noh, S. J., Kim, J. R., Park, H. J., Kwon, K. S., Jung, S. H., Park, H. S., Park, B., Lee, H., Moon, W. S., Sylvester, K. G., Jang, K. Y. 2016; 186 (12): 3297-3315

Abstract

Recently, the roles of sirtuins (SIRTs) in tumorigenesis have been of interest to oncologists, and protein kinase CK2 a1 (CSNK2A1) has been shown to be involved in tumorigenesis by phosphorylating various proteins, including SIRT1. Therefore, we evaluated the roles of CSNK2A1, SIRT6, and phosphorylated SIRT6 and their relationships in breast carcinoma. Nuclear expression of CSNK2A1 and SIRT6 predicted shorter overall survival and relapse-free survival by multivariate analysis. Inhibition of CSNK2A1 decreased the proliferative and invasive activity of cancer cells. In addition, CSNK2A1 was bound to SIRT6 and phosphorylated SIRT6; evidence for this is provided from immunofluorescence staining, co-immunoprecipitation of CSNK2A1 and SIRT6, a glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, an in vitro kinase assay, and transfection of mutant CSNK2A1. Knockdown of SIRT6 decreased the proliferation and invasiveness of cancer cells. Overexpression of SIRT6 increased proliferation, but mutation at the Ser338 phosphorylation site of SIRT6 inhibited the proliferation of MCF7 cells. Moreover, both knockdown of SIRT6 and a mutation at the phosphorylation site of SIRT6 decreased expression of matrix metallopeptidase 9, ß-catenin, cyclin D1, and NF-?B. Especially, SIRT6 expression was associated with the nuclear localization of ß-catenin. This study demonstrates that CSNK2A1 and SIRT6 are indicators of poor prognosis for breast carcinomas and that CSNK2A1-mediated phosphorylation of SIRT6 might be involved in the progression of breast carcinoma.

View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ajpath.2016.08.007

View details for Web of Science ID 000389103800020

View details for PubMedID 27746184