Gait mechanics 2 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are associated with longer-term changes in patient-reported outcomes. Journal of orthopaedic research Erhart-Hledik, J. C., Chu, C. R., Asay, J. L., Andriacchi, T. P. 2016

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that side-to-side differences in knee gait mechanics 2 years after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are associated with long-term (~8 years post-reconstruction) changes in patient-reported outcome scores. Sixteen subjects (5 males; age: 29.1?±?7.1 years) with primary unilateral ACL reconstruction were gait tested at baseline (2.2?±?0.3 years post-ACL reconstruction) and filled out KOOS and Lysholm surveys. At long-term follow-up (7.7?±?0.7 years post-ACL reconstruction), the same subjects completed KOOS and Lysholm surveys. Pearson correlation coefficients assessed relationships between side-to-side differences in kinematics and kinetics at baseline and changes in Lysholm and KOOS Pain/QOL scores from 2 to 8 years post-ACL reconstruction. Significant associations were seen between greater average varus rotation (Lysholm: R?=?-0.654, p?=?0.006) and less anterior femoral displacement (Lysholm: R?=?0.578, p?=?0.019) during stance of the ACL reconstructed knee versus the contralateral knee at baseline and worse follow-up outcome scores. Significant associations were seen between greater peak knee flexion moment (KOOS Pain: R?=?-0.572, p?=?0.026; KOOS QOL: R?=?-0.636, p?=?0.011), peak knee adduction moment (Lysholm: R?=?-0.582, p?=?0.018; KOOS Pain: R?=?-0.742, p?=?0.002; KOOS QOL: R?=?-0.551, p?=?0.033), and peak internal rotation moment (Lysholm: R?=?0.525, p?=?0.037; KOOS Pain: R?=?0.815, p?

View details for DOI 10.1002/jor.23317

View details for PubMedID 27238273