Autoantibody profiling on a plasmonic nano-gold chip for the early detection of hypertensive heart disease. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Li, X., Kuznetsova, T., Cauwenberghs, N., Wheeler, M., Maecker, H., Wu, J. C., Haddad, F., Dai, H. 2017; 114 (27): 7089–94

Abstract

The role of autoimmunity in cardiovascular (CV) diseases has been increasingly recognized. Autoimmunity is most commonly examined by the levels of circulating autoantibodies in clinical practices. Measurement of autoantibodies remains, however, challenging because of the deficiency of reproducible, sensitive, and standardized assays. The lack of multiplexed assays also limits the potential to identify a CV-specific autoantibody profile. To overcome these challenges, we developed a nanotechnology-based plasmonic gold chip for autoantibody profiling. This approach allowed simultaneous detection of 10 CV autoantibodies targeting the structural myocardial proteins, the neurohormonal regulatory proteins, the vascular proteins, and the proteins associated with apoptosis and coagulation. Autoantibodies were measured in four groups of participants across the continuum of hypertensive heart diseases. We observed higher levels of all 10 CV autoantibodies in hypertensive subjects (n= 77) compared with healthy participants (n= 30), and the autoantibodies investigated were related to each other, forming a highly linked network. In addition, we established that autoantibodies to troponin I, annexin-A5, and beta 1-adrenegic receptor best discriminated hypertensive subjects with adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling or dysfunction (n= 49) from hypertensive subjects with normal LV structure and function (n= 28). By further linking these three significant CV autoantibodies to the innate and growth factors, we revealed a positive but weak association between autoantibodies to troponin I and proinflammatory cytokine IL-18. Overall, we demonstrated that this platform can be used to evaluate autoantibody profiles in hypertensive subjects at risk for heart failure.

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