Relationship of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Origin on the Distal Femur to the Distal Femoral Physis: A Systematic Review. The American journal of sports medicine Sochacki, K. R., Shea, K. G., Varshneya, K., Safran, M. R., Abrams, G. D., Donahue, J., Sherman, S. L. 2020: 363546520904685

Abstract

The relationship between the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and the distal femoral physis has been reported in multiple studies.To determine the distance from the MPFL central origin on the distal femur to the medial distal femoral physis in skeletally immature participants.Systematic review.A systematic review was performed according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Multiple databases were searched for studies investigating the anatomic origin of the MPFL on the distal femur and its relationship to the medial distal femoral physis in skeletally immature participants. Study methodological quality was analyzed with the Anatomical Quality Assessment tool, with studies categorized as low risk, high risk, or unclear risk of bias. Continuous variable data were reported as mean ± SD. Categorical variable data were reported as frequency with percentage.Seven articles were analyzed (298 femurs, 53.7% male patients; mean age, 11.7 ± 3.4 years). There was low risk of bias based on the Anatomical Quality Assessment tool. The distance from the MPFL origin to the distal femoral physis ranged from 3.7 mm proximal to the physis to 10.0 mm distal to the physis in individual studies. Six of 7 studies reported that the MPFL origin on the distal femur lies distal to the medial distal femoral physis in the majority of specimens. The MPFL originated distal to the medial distal femoral physis in 92.8% of participants at a mean distance of 6.9 ± 2.4 mm.The medial patellofemoral ligament originates distal to the medial distal femoral physis in the majority of cases at a mean proximal-to-distal distance of 7 mm distal to the physis. However, this is variable in the literature owing to study design and patient age and sex.

View details for DOI 10.1177/0363546520904685

View details for PubMedID 32109145