A phase 2 study of ATRA, arsenic trioxide, and gemtuzumab ozogamicin in patients with high-risk APL (SWOG 0535). Blood advances Lancet, J. E., Moseley, A. B., Coutre, S. E., DeAngelo, D. J., Othus, M., Tallman, M. S., Litzow, M. R., Komrokji, R. S., Erba, H. P., Appelbaum, F. R. 2020; 4 (8): 1683–89

Abstract

High-risk acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) remains a therapeutic challenge, with higher associated rates of early mortality and relapse than standard-risk APL. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) plus arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a well-established treatment for patients with standard-risk APL, but it is not well defined for those with high-risk APL. In a prior study of patients with high-risk APL, the addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) to ATO plus ATRA suggested benefit. The SWOG Cancer Research Network conducted a phase 2 study to confirm the efficacy and safety of the combination of ATRA plus ATO plus GO in treating high-risk APL patients. The primary end points were 3-year event-free survival (EFS) and early (6-week) death rates associated with this combination. Seventy patients were treated. With a median follow-up of 3.4 years, the 3-year EFS and overall survival estimates were 78% (95% confidence interval [CI], 67%-86%) and 86% (95% CI, 75%-92%), respectively. Overall, 86% of patients achieved complete response. The 6-week mortality rate was 11%. The most common treatment-emergent toxicities during the induction phase included febrile neutropenia, aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase elevation, hyperglycemia, hypoxia, headache, and prolonged QT interval corrected for heart rate. Retinoic acid syndrome occurred in 9% of patients. Approximately 37% of patients did not complete all planned courses of postremission therapy. The combination of ATRA plus ATO plus GO in high-risk APL patients was effective and generally well tolerated, suggesting an opportunity to offer a chemotherapy-free induction platform for patients with this disease. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00551460.

View details for DOI 10.1182/bloodadvances.2019001278

View details for PubMedID 32330241