Change in emotion-regulation strategy for women with metastatic breast cancer following supportive-expressive group therapy JOURNAL OF CONSULTING AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Giese-Davis, J., Koopman, C., Butler, L. D., Classen, C., Cordova, M., Fobair, P., Benson, J., Kraemer, H. C., Spiegel, D. 2002; 70 (4): 916-925

Abstract

Four relatively independent emotion-regulation constructs (suppression of negative affect, restraint, repression, and emotional self-efficacy) were tested as outcomes in a randomized trial of supportive-expressive group therapy for women with metastatic breast cancer. Results indicate that report of suppression of negative affect decreased and restraint of aggressive, inconsiderate, impulsive, and irresponsible behavior increased in the treatment group as compared with controls over 1 year in the group. Groups did not differ over time on repression or emotional self-efficacy. This study provides evidence that emotion-focused therapy can help women with advanced breast cancer to become more expressive without becoming more hostile. Even though these aspects of emotion-regulation appear trait-like within the control group, significant change was observed with treatment.

View details for DOI 10.1037//0022-006X.70.4.916

View details for Web of Science ID 000177347400006

View details for PubMedID 12182275